Creating and Editing Parts

Below are a collection of tutorial videos on designing parts for your PCB designs using AutoTRAX. Click on one to view the video.

Creating a part with 4 schematic symbols (Split part)

This video show you how to create a 4000 CMOS logic device (two triple input NOR gates and an inverter) using AutoTRAX. This demonstrates how to create probably one of the most complex parts for AutoTRAX. Once you master how to create one of these, all other parts will seem easy. The part will consist of 4 separate symbols (two triple input NOR gates, an inverter and power symbol). The 3D model is automatically created.

 Creating a custom potentiometer

This video show you how to create a part for a Bourns 3362 potentiometer. It show you how to create the custom footprint/land pattern and the custom schematic symbol. It also show you how to import a 3D model and position in. Finally it shows the device being used on a PCB.

 Splitting Part Symbols on a Schematic

This video shows you how to split the symbol for a part that has already been placed onto a schematic into 3 separate symbols. This is done in order to split the functionality so you can place 3 different symbols for the same part on 3 separate schematics.

 Parts

This video demonstrates and explains the role parts have in AutoTRAX.

 Customizing a parametric footprint

In AutoTRAX, a parametric footprint is a part that is defined by a small number of numeric and textural parameters. From this small set of parameters, AutoTRAX can generate whole families of parts with the schematic symbols, footprints (often called land patterns) and even the 3D part.

 Capturing Pin Details from a PDF

Often you will find a data sheet for a part on the internet is a Adobe compatatible PDF. AutoTRAX can help you capture the symbol details from the part by monitoring your key clicks on the parts PDF. This enables you to rapidly create your own custom parts.

 Creating a Custom SOT223 Transistor

This video show you how to create a custom SOT223 for a BSP16T1 High Voltage Transistor in AutoTRAX.

 Creating a Power Mosfet Part

This video show you how to create a large pad area beneath a part to help dissipate heat. It show you how to create a custom pad shape that connects 4 pins on a device.

 How to create a PCB pad with a rounded end

This video show you how to create a pad with a rounded end using AutoTRAX.

 Adding Thermal Vias

To help dissipate excess heat from a device, a manufacturer will often add a large central pad to the base of the parts package. AutoTRAX can add thermal vias or heat pipes to the pad to help transfer the heat to the opposite side of the PCB where you can add a large heat dissipating area or even a heat sink.

 Creating round, rectangular and polygonal pads and offsetting pad holes

This video shows you how to add round/elliptical, rectangular and polygonal pads to a custom part footprint/land pattern. It also shows you how to offset pad holes.

 Symbol Rotation Comparison between AutoTRAX and Altium Designer

This video gives you a comparison of rotating schematic symbols in AutoTRAX and rotating schematic symbols in Altium Designer. It shows how AutoTRAX respects your original layout when rotating but Altium does not. It also shows how AutoTRAX maintains the center of rotation but Altium goes walkabout.

 Symbol Rotation in Schematics

This video show you how you can rotate schematics symbols easily and avoid the symbol breaking up or becoming muddled.

 Renumbering Pads for PCB parts

This video show you how to easily renumber pads in either the part editor or on actual PCBs by simply clicking on each pad in turn.

 Create a PCB Footprint by Tracing From a PDF (with captions)”

This video show you how to create a PCB footprint from an image captured from a PDF displayed in a browser. The image is copied and pasted into the footprint designer and pads are traced over the image to produce the final footprint.

 Create a PCB Footprint by Tracing From a PDF

This video show you how to create a PCB footprint from an image captured from a PDF displayed in a browser. The image is copied and pasted into the footprint designer and pads are traced over the image to produce the final footprint.

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